• SHOP

    You can see more of my artwork and if you are interested you can also buy from the following websites: ANNA ALCOCK ON ETSY ANNA ALCOCK ON ARTFINDER

  • Relief Prints

    Relief prints: these are linocuts, wood cuts and wood-engravings. All quite physical processes where the plate is carved by hand with wood-cutting tools or wood-engraving tools (they are different) and then printed on either a relief press or by hand (rubbing the back of the paper). Wood-engraving tends to be quite small and finely detailed […]

  • Etchings

    Intaglio: which means ‘from underneath’.  Metal plates which have drawn lines incised into them (where the drawing is) are inked up by putting ink all over the plate.  The excess ink on the surface of the plate (copper or zinc in Anna’s case) is wiped off so that the only ink is in the lines. […]

  • Screenprints

    Screenprints: Thought to have originated in China, this involves pushing ink through a fine mesh – the areas that are blocked out (and don’t print) are created using a variety of techniques including paper templates, freely drawing onto screens and uv photographic exposure. You can see more about my screenprints here:

SHOP

You can see more of my artwork and if you are interested you can also buy from the following websites: ANNA ALCOCK ON ETSY ANNA ALCOCK ON ARTFINDER

Relief Prints

Relief prints: these are linocuts, wood cuts and wood-engravings. All quite physical processes where the plate is carved by hand with wood-cutting tools or wood-engraving tools (they are different) and then printed on either a relief press or by hand (rubbing the back of the paper). Wood-engraving tends to be quite small and finely detailed […]

Etchings

Intaglio: which means ‘from underneath’.  Metal plates which have drawn lines incised into them (where the drawing is) are inked up by putting ink all over the plate.  The excess ink on the surface of the plate (copper or zinc in Anna’s case) is wiped off so that the only ink is in the lines. […]

Screenprints

Screenprints: Thought to have originated in China, this involves pushing ink through a fine mesh – the areas that are blocked out (and don’t print) are created using a variety of techniques including paper templates, freely drawing onto screens and uv photographic exposure. You can see more about my screenprints here: